violence worker links


---"Part of our misunderstanding about the nature of policing is we keep imagining that we can turn police into social workers. That we can make them nice, friendly community outreach workers. But police are violence workers. That's what distinguishes them from all other government functions. ... They have the legal capacity to use violence in situations where the average citizen would be arrested.

So when we turn a problem over to the police to manage, there will be violence, because those are ultimately the tools that they are most equipped to utilize: handcuffs, threats, guns, arrests. That's what really is at the root of policing. So if we don't want violence, we should try to figure out how to not get the police involved." --from "How Much Do We Need the Police?" by Leah Donnella 

---"New York City’s Curfew Is Only Leading to More Police Brutality" by Ryan Bort

---"Cuomo, de Blasio Say They Haven’t Seen Videos of the NYPD Abusing Protesters, so We’re Posting Them Here to Be Helpful" by Ben Mathis-Lilley

---General C Q Brown Jr.'s thoughts about "the current events surrounding the tragic death of George Floyd"

---"What are the police for? Why are we paying for this?

The death of George Floyd and the egregious, unprovoked acts of police violence at the peaceful protests following his death have raised these urgent questions. Police forces across America need root-to-stem changes—to their internal cultures, training and hiring practices, insurance, and governing regulations. Now a longtime demand from social-justice campaigners has become a rallying cry: Defund the police. This is in one sense a last-resort policy: If cops cannot stop killing people, and black people in particular, society needs fewer of them. But it is also and more urgently a statement of first principles: The country needs to shift financing away from surveillance and punishment, and toward fostering equitable, healthy, and safe communities." --from "Defund the Police" by Annie Lowrey


---"Just a few hundred feet north of the White House on Wednesday afternoon, armed agents of the federal government, dressed in a patchwork of colors and protective gear, stared down peaceful protesters demonstrating for Black lives. Yet what was perhaps most alarming was what was not visible on many of the officers: any insignia revealing their identity or even the name of the agency they work for." --from
"William Barr’s Vast, Nameless Army Is Being Brought To Bear On D.C. Protesters" by Ryan J. Reilly and Tara Golshan

---"Not very long ago, a well-meaning white acquaintance asked me how it felt to incessantly think about living, in the United States, in the shadow of total police impunity. I answered, after blinking at him, by saying that I didn’t incessantly think about it. Nor did I not incessantly think about it. It’s just the same way that you (and you know who you are) don’t think about putting one foot in front of the other. We have to go about our lives; at the same time, there is this thing right here, which is to say everywhere in this country, that might end it at any time. We still play in the park, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still snack in our living rooms, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still read in our cars, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still blast our favorite music, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still pull into the grocery-store parking lot, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still babysit, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still ring in the New Year, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still drive home from dinner with our partners, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still go out and about only to find ourselves misidentified, owing to an administrative error in an office somewhere, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still go for walks in the neighborhood, and we might be shot and killed for that. We still take naps at home, and we might be shot and killed for that. We can be killed for any of these things—or anything else, really—with total impunity for the killers." from
"George Floyd, Houston’s Protests, and Living Without the Benefit of the Doubt" by Bryan Washington

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